Politically Fused and History Making Emmys

Filled with drama and upsets, the 69th Emmy Awards was one to never forget

courtesy+of%3A+vanityfair.com
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Politically Fused and History Making Emmys

courtesy of: vanityfair.com

courtesy of: vanityfair.com

courtesy of: vanityfair.com

courtesy of: vanityfair.com

Nadia Starbinski, Social Media Manager

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The Microsoft Theater in downtown Los Angeles was booming on September 17 for the 69 Primetime Emmy Awards. The night was filled with political undertones and both laughter mixed with confusion, as some of the biggest names in entertainment were denied their expectant wins; despite what experts predicted.

Comedian and host of “The Late Show,” Stephen Colbert, opened the awards with a song-and-dance number that featured an array of TV’s favorite faces.

The musical number cleverly poked fun at how, thanks to too much TV, it’s easier than ever to ignore the world’s problems by getting lost in great, Emmy-nominated shows like “Veep,” “The Americans” and “Archer.” Rather than engage in the political madness out there.

With all the underlying political laughter, things fell silent as Sean Spicer, ex-Press Secretary to the White House, showed up on stage beside Colbert. As the camera’s cut to audience members, it was clear they were left aghast. When Colbert jokingly thanked Melissa McCarthy, who portrays Spicer on “Saturday Night Live,” she still appeared equally stunned.

The Emmys had some surprising wins such as Hulu’s original “The Handmaid’s Tale” stole the show for Outstanding Drama Series, despite being up against powerhouses “Stranger Things,” “House of Cards,” “Westworld” and “This is Us.”

Donald Glover, aka Childish Gambino, made history by winning the Emmys for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series and Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series. This award made him the first African American actor to win in the Comedy-Directing category by beating out Emmy favorite, Jeffrey Tambor for “Transparent.”

While on the topic of firsts, Lena Waithe became the first African American woman to win an Emmy for Outstanding Writing in a Comedy Series. Her award is mostly decorated for writing the “Thanksgiving” episode of “Master of None” with Aziz Ansari, both of which received a standing ovation when they got to the stage.

A wide range of shows telling honest stories about a wide variety of people won Emmy’s, showing that diversity not only works, but also resonates. Surprises and snubs filled the night, along with outstanding history-making wins. But one thing is for sure- the politics will never leave the award shows. You can find the full list of Emmy award winners here.